REDUCED TRANSPORT DEMAND, INCREASING OVERCAPACITY, AND LOW FREIGHT & CHARTER RATES HAVE BECOME A MAJOR CONCERN IN THE MARITIME INDUSTRY.
LAYING-UP OF SHIPS IS THE COST-EFFECTIVE OPTION AVAILABLE TO SHIP OWNERS FOR MEETING THESE CHALLENGES.

COST EFFECTIVE. TOTAL FLEXIBILITY
Depending on the extent the vessel needs to be laid-up, SAI offers four different modes of lay-up:

Hot lay-up (24-hours reactivation)

This lay-up condition is suitable for up to a month out of service. In this condition, the vessel is held within Classification and Flag State requirements, although crew numbers may be reduced to certified minimum safety crewing limits. Machinery is kept operational but economies are made. The vessel is located in an area close to potential cargo trade routes.

Warm lay-up (one-week reactivation)

Suitable for up to 12 months out of service. In this condition, vessel crewing is reduced to below the trading limit and in agreement with the Flag State, Classification Society, insurers and local authorities. Most ports will only grant a temporary permit to lay-up a vessel in this condition in port, provided that Class and Flag surveys are conducted. There may be local restrictions on vessels operations such as restrictions on the transfer of oily bilge water.

Cold lay-up (three-week reactivation)
Suitable for up to five years out of service. In this condition, vessel crewing is in line with emergency requirements to deal with fire, flooding, mooring and security watch. Cold ship lay-up locations are generally remote so access to the vessel can be limited. Upon reactivation, the vessel may need to go direct to dry dock before trading, depending on the extent of any hull marine growth. It is imperative that all preparations and processes during cold lay-up are well documented as crew changes may be significant.
Long-term lay-up (three-month reactivation)

Suitable for up to more than five years out of service. In this extended condition, preparations are comprehensive as original manufacturers (OEM) are consulted for critical equipment. Any
remedial work done on reactivation is likely to be extensive and
unpredictable, such as renewal of alarm systems that may have
become obsolete. For long-term lay-ups, several vessel are laid up
side-by-side to minimise supervision costs.
SAI is aware of all the potential problems involved in lay-ups and
has the experience, expertise and resources to avoid the pitfalls.

Ship to Ship Transhipment